Sunday, July 31, 2011

My passionate journey to EcoBirth

When I was raising my children, I thought all I needed to do was to raise good children and everything would be OK. 

When they were grown, I realized that the outside world in which they were conceived and now live and in which their children will be raised, had drastically changed to include hazards about which I knew little, much too little.



I started searching for answers, which brought me to a lot of research and eye-opening information. I soon realized that I had to look at my lineage and our home San Francisco to grasp what could continue to affect my children and grandchildren. 


 

This story is my increasing consciousness  of  what we are doing to ourselves, our fellow creatures and our world. And the realization that my family's heritage is intrinsically connected to the creation of those toxins that could have affected them and could still be affecting me, my children






  and now my grandchildren.  




I see now that my journey to EcoBirth integrates all the strands of my personal story in an intimate portrait that connects me to my lineage and to my legacy and immutably to my primary environment, our devoted Mother Earth. 




 I am not a doctor or scientist, but I am claiming my authority as a life-giver to speak up about what has been happening to our world and to take responsibility for my role in it. 
Generations have been adversely affected by our human interference with nature and natural processes and cycles.

 
I want a world in which babies are born toxin-free, births are experienced in a safe and normal way, and that our children’s connection to our planet will nourish and sustain them throughout their lives.
I claim the hope and certainty that we can make our world a better place by enabling a pure and caring home for all creatures, particularly when they are born from their first environment, their mother’s womb to their primary environment -our Mother Earth.


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The Story of EcoBirth- a Mother's Legacy in San Francisco


In 1887 a baby was born in San Francisco, she was named Katherine Connor Oliver, she was given her mother’s name. 
In Northern California, starting with the Gold Rush, mercury was used extensively in hydraulic gold mining in order to help “capture” gold.  Mercury was also used in silver mining. 
My Grammy, the baby, was gestated in her mother’s womb when local water and local food could have been contaminated with the mines flushing of mercury into the rivers that feed the SF Bay. This heavy metal has been correlated with birth defects and lower IQ. It is called a neurotoxin and can permanently affect our health.  
  
 My Mommy was created then too, in my Grammy’s body as an egg. She could have been affected by that same mercury. The placenta is not a barrier of safety; it distributes to the baby what is in the mother’s body. 

Declaration of Interdependence for EcoBirth

30 minute full presentation of My Personal Environmental Story

Interview about Women's Congress for Future Generations